Stop teen dating abuse

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In all likelihood, your young teen is experiencing significant emotional, psychological and physical changes.

And, while your teen needs you more than ever to help them through this challenging time, they are also seeking independence and turning to peers.

Abuse may include insults, coercion, social sabotage, sexual harassment, stalking, threats and/or acts of physical or sexual abuse.

The abusive partner uses this pattern of violent and coercive behavior to gain power and maintain control over the dating partner.

This webpage provides resources and technical assistance that support meeting the requirements of this legislation and helps educators and others find information to support the development of healthy and safe relationships.

S.) Section 10-220a requires each local or regional board of education to provide in-service training programs for its teachers, administrators, and pupil personnel on teen dating violence and domestic violence programs.

Did you know that alcohol and drugs play a major role in increasing violence toward a partner in a relationship?

February is National Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, designed to raise awareness about this and related issues. One study found that, in junior high and high school, teens who drank alcohol before age 13 were more likely to be both victims and abusers when it comes to physical dating violence.

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If you think your son or daughter may be controlling, abusive, or violent with his or her partner, tell your child that abuse and violence are NOT acceptable and that violence will not solve problems.

While it may seem easier to let your teen shake you loose, hang on. Right now, your teen is forming relationships that set the stage for future relationships.

Given that 1 in 5 high schoolers experience dating violence, you’ll want to be sure you do your part to help your child understand what a healthy relationship feels and looks like.

If your teen isn’t ready to openly communicate with you about his or her relationship, let him or her know there are confidential resources and trained individuals available to answer questions and help avoid unhealthy relationships.

Pass on the information below, but let your teen know you are SAN FRANCISCO (April 27, 2016) – Futures Without Violence (FUTURES) announced today that it received its first Webby Award for That’s Not Cool, a website aimed at preventing teen dating violence and digital abuse.

This may also include abuse, harassment, and stalking via electronic devices such as cell phones and computers, and harassment through a third party, and may be physical, mental, or both.

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