Dating violence among

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This article provides the first comprehensive estimate of the distribution of dating and relationship violence and of risk and variation of DRV according to socio-demographic and behavioural factors with a large sample of FE students in England and Wales.Establishing the association between socio-demographic, contextual and behavioural characteristics with DRV will help to inform whether universal or targeted interventions are appropriate.there is limited evidence on its application for sexual health or in FE settings.Comprehensive sexual health interventions in US high schools show promising results but they have not been developed for use in UK FE settings.Multiple modes of recruitment were used to invite all students aged 16–19 to participate.Information about the study and a weblink to the electronic (e)-questionnaire were emailed to all students using their institutional email where possible.

Trained fieldworkers attended each data collection session.

The majority (58%) of questionnaires were completed electronically with others completed via pen and paper copy due to limited Internet/tablet access.

Ethical approval was sought from the Cardiff University School of Social Sciences Research Ethics Committee.

Among females, 46.1% experienced controlling behaviours and 31.6% threatening behaviours; 49.9% of males experienced controlling behaviours, 27.1% threatening behaviours and 5.8% online sexual violence.

The odds of DRV victimization were 2–8 times greater for males and 2–4 times greater for females who had ever sent a sexually explicit image.

To establish a suitable measure of DRV, this article considers the prevalence of different forms of DRV within a relationship, together with the severity and frequency of these behaviours, relative to young people in England and Wales.

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